Lent, a Hare, and Good Stories

We are in the season some call Lent, which the Merriam-Webster dictionary defines as “the 40 weekdays from Ash Wednesday to Easter observed by the Roman Catholic, Eastern, and some Protestant churches as a period of penitence and fasting”. As a child, I gave up chocolate as a way to pretend I was being pentinent (which wasn’t very difficult since chocolate wasn’t a staple around the house). I hadn’t a clue what pentinent meant, or what Lent was supposed to represent; I just knew that the weeks before Easter were dreary, and the Easter Bunny would soon bring relief.

So how and when did a rabbit become a symbol of Easter, carrying a basket of eggs, when a rabbit doesn’t even lay eggs? According to German Lutheran tradition from the 1600s, the Easter hare was a kind of Santa Claus who dispensed eggs to children who had been good. Rabbits were certainly active in the spring and their talents did not go unnoticed among signs of seasonal awakening. Wikipedia also explains that Orthodox churches had a custom of abstaining from eating eggs during Lent, boiling them to preserve for the end of the fast. Perhaps this is the source of their appearance in Easter baskets, but it still requires a lot of imagination to connect eggs to a hare. We adopted these symbols after Europeans left their homelands in the 1800s, bringing their traditions to America with them.

Enjoying the arrival of spring is a universal pleasure, and there’s nothing wrong with a good story to support festivities. My preference, however, is for the much older story that celebrates renewed life following a period of darkness and distance, after a Lent observed as a remembrance of Jesus’ 40 days in the wilderness. I hope that story of rebirth and resurrection is still being shared with children, and isn’t entirely lost in commercialism and chocolate and cuteness. It has a great deal more staying power, and its source continues to send endless means through which to see the world with refreshed vision. I found renewal at the Arboretum this week, where the message was loud and clear. Hope Springs Eternal. And it is stunningly beautiful.


Last Views of Peru


We saw a great deal in two weeks, but I’m certain there’s much more to see. We stayed in lovely modern hotels and ate fabulous food in touted restaurants, but the countryside offers historic sites and traditional culture that’s extremely appealing as well. There are many more ruins than Machu Picchu to see, salt flats, shamans, hat makers, textile weavers, llama reserves, wonderful cathedrals, lakes, the dramatic Andes, and tiny towns lost in time. It was our first foray into South America, but I hope not our last.


The Lake with the Funny Name


Lake Titicaca’s name amused me in grade school, but I had no idea where it was located. Now I know it shares borders with Peru and Bolivia, is said to be the highest navigable lake in the world at elevation of 12,500 feet, and requires an effort to see. It is the largest lake in South America, and not an easy place to live when high winds, cool temperatures and intense sun work on its surface. But the Uros people have chosen it as their home for centuries.

An hour-long boat ride from the Peruvian town of Puno will lead to a cluster of Uros’ floating island homes, made of cut buoyant reeds which grow in shallow portions of the lake. The islands can be anchored or moved as necessary, and are augmented or replaced regularly. Walking on them is like walking on a water-bed the size of a football field. A typical island belongs to an extended family, and may include reed boats, watch towers, and other reed creatures to help differentiate and identify them.

The Uros can get needed supplies from Puno, and they have a few solar panels on the islands to generate a little power, but for the most part the islanders make a living showing their homes, reed boats and crafts to tourists. Their population is dwindling, and in another generation may be gone altogether. As challenging as their circumstances may be, we were glad to see them working hard to keep their unique traditions alive.






Malls and Markets

Lima-81If you like sophisticated malls full of the latest fashions, gadgets and a vibrant night life, or prefer country markets with handmade goods and foods, Peru can satisfying your cravings. Lima offers dramatic coastal views and lovely historic squares along with your Starbucks latte and Patagonia sporting goods, while further down the street and up in the mountains it’s all about textiles, textures, fresh-baked pastries and organic vegetables. Your will be treated to a visual feast wherever you go.


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